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Cannelés

5 from 1 reviews

Recipe adapted from My Little French Kitchen by Rachel Khoo

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Place the milk, butter and vanilla pod in a small saucepan and bring to the boil. Remove the pan from the heat and let it cool a little.
  2. Place the flour, icing sugar and salt into a large mixing bowl.
  3. Place the eggs and egg yolks into a separate bowl and beat lightly.
  4. Pour the warm milk and eggs into the bowl with the dry ingredients. Whisk everything together gently until you have a smooth batter.
  5. Strain the batter into a clean bowl, and press through any lumps in the sieve.
  6. Stir through the rum and return the used vanilla pod to the bowl.
  7. Cover the bowl with clingfilm and leave in the fridge for 2 days or longer to rest.

If using a silicone mould:

  1. Preheat the oven to 240°C (460°F).
  2. Place the mould on a baking tray and heat it in the oven for 4-5 minutes.
  3. Remove the batter from the fridge and give it a gentle mix.
  4. Pour the batter into the mould, leaving a 1 cm border from the top.
  5. Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce the oven to 190°C (375°F), and bake for a further 1 hour until the cakes have achieved a golden, bronze colour.
  6. Remove the cakes immediately from the mould and leave them to cool on a wire rack.

If using copper moulds:

  1. Preheat the oven to 240°C (460°F).
  2. Place the moulds on a baking tray and heat the moulds in the oven for 4-5 minutes.
  3. Generously grease the moulds with melted butter (use an oven kit to hold each mould).
  4. Remove the batter from the fridge and give it a gentle mix.
  5. Pour the batter into the mould, leaving a 1 cm border from the top.
  6. Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce the oven to 190°C (375°F), and bake for a further 45 minutes until the cakes have achieved a golden, bronze colour.
  7. Remove the cakes immediately from the mould and leave them to cool on a wire rack.

Kitchen Notes

If you are using copper cannelés moulds for the first time, you will need to season them first. This comprehensive webpage covers all you need to know about cannelés, as well as instructions for seasoning your new moulds (scroll down towards the bottom of the page).

Many recipes will tell you to avoid getting too much air into the batter and, therefore, to not use a whisk. I wasn’t aware of this before conducting my experiment, and used a whisk with no detrimental effect. However, I would recommend whisking the batter only very gently. If there is too much air in your batter, the cakes risk rising like a soufflé and perhaps overspilling. During baking, the cakes will rise slightly (like a soufflé), but they should fall back down again during the baking process.

Part of the joy of these cakes is the crisp, caramelised coating. To achieve this, the cakes will need to be baked until quite brown and golden, but not so much that they are burnt. Check the colour after the specified time in the recipe and, if you need to bake them for longer, keep checking at 5 minute intervals or so.

If you don’t own a copper or silicone cannelés mould, at a pinch, you could use a non-stick mini Bundt tin or a muffin tin and follow the same instructions as for the copper moulds.

Nutrition

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